Flashback Friday: “Betrayal at Baldur’s Gate”

After my first two articles on model painting just being ink jobs I wanted to share some more complete paint jobs that I had completed for tabletop figures!

We revisit this article in this week’s Flashback Friday! I hope you enjoy!

Betrayal at Baldur’s Gate

This article was orginally published on 29th September 2018

After having a very enjoyable time playing Betrayal at House on the Hill with some friends I decided to pick up a copy myself. Whilst I was looking up the game I discovered that there was a Dungeons and Dragons version of this game; Betrayal at Baldur’s Gate.

I had no choice, I had to get it!

When the box arrived I opened it and was pleasantly surprised to discover that the figures inside the box are very well detailed and molded, and at the same scale as general war-game figures with a 1 inch base (or close enough to pass). However the painting on these figures was, in my view, terrible. The half-orc and the drow had well-printed eyes, but apart from that the painting just completely undermined these beautifully sculpted figures.

20180511_202110.jpg
Fresh out the box. Look at that poor Red Wizard of Thay’s face!

This post is unfortunately not a step-by-step on how I fixed these paint-jobs, as I painted these before I decided to record my painting process. This is more of a showcase of what I can do, given that my first two posts were all about inking, without substantial painting to the models.

20180512_160049.jpg
Look at that Paladin’s armour shine!

I have almost finished painting these figures; I just have to complete the ranger (seen in green at the back of the second picture) but I will be more interested in posting up more extensive paint-jobs I do on the Rage of Demons figures I have, followed up by some Warhammer 40,000 and some figures from the Castle Ravenloft and Legend of Drizzt board games.

 

If you want to see more hot Dungeons and Dragons content click here!

Flashback Friday: “Rage of Demons: Lizardfolk”

It’s another Flashback Friday, where we look at an old article I wrote a a year ago. This weeks article is a continuation of the model painting articles I first started this site with!

I hope to revisit some model painting articles in the future when I have time to break out my paints once again! Until then I hope you enjoy!

Rage of Demons: Lizardfolk

This article was first published on 22nd September 2018

Following on from my Banshee post I decided I would post another model that I only had to ink for me to be completely satisfied with the end product. That model is a Lizardfolk that I got out of the same set of Rage of Demons boxes that I got the Banshees out of.

How the Lizardfolk model looked out of the box.

Once again the modelling on this particular model is beautiful and precise. This is joined with an excellent paint job; one of the best paint jobs I have seen on these models. The paint is on the correct parts and does not overlap onto sections it should not be, even the printed on face is precise.  This figure looks almost exactly like the artwork in both the Monster Manual and Volo’s Guide to Monsters.

The only thing I was unhappy with was the fact that all of those beautiful details were not emphasised by the painting. With that in mind I watered down some paints again!

I mixed a very dark, almost black, shade of green and watered it down into an almost ink-like texture once again. I then carefully painted it only over the green and brown painted parts of the model, making sure that it stuck in all the needed cracks and crevices. Once I had done this I mixed a dark yellow; not too dark, but enough to add some shade to the cream coloured scales that were on the Lizardfolk’s belly and underside. In the same way I then inked the cream scales and left it all to dry.

How the Lizardfolk looked after ‘inking’.

As can be seen the adding of the ultra-thin paint just makes the model ‘pop’; you can even see detail on the shield that I had not even noticed before painting, and the whole model is lifted to a new level.

I will post up some images of more extensive paint-jobs soon.

 

If you want to check out more hot Dungeons and Dragons content just click here!

Flashback Friday: “Rage of Demons: Banshee”

Now This is art, not real life is one year old, I can start to flashback to some of my older posts. If you haven’t seen these before this is the perfect oppertunity to read some new content, or see where this website started!

With that in mind this Flashback Friday I want to take a look back at the first post I ever made on This is art, not real life.

Rage of Demons: Banshee

This article was originally published on 15th September 2018

I bought a few boxes of the Dungeons and Dragons mini-figures for Rage of Demons. I have recently bought the Out of the Abyss adventure and as I was reading through it I thought I would see how the mini-figures look, and I was very impressed.

The figures are very well molded, and very nicely detailed however unsurprisingly the paint work on them as a lot to be desired. Often the printed-on eyes look much better than I could achieve with paints, but they are often not placed accurately, and the rest of the paint on the models is, generally, of a low quality.

With that in mind I have decided to record my painting of these models. The first models I painted were two Banshees I picked up from two different boxes.

20180915_160408
How the Banshee looked out of the box.

As you can see the molding is very detailed and the plastic it is made out of works perfectly for a ghost-like enemy, along with the printed on face, which is very accurate on this figure.

Personally I prefer my models details to be emphasised, and this being a Banshee I wanted it to be illuminated in a slightly sickly green-blue hue, to emphasise the unnatural nature of the creature.

With that in mind I mixed some green, blue and black acrylic paints and watered the dark turquoise colour down heavily until the consistency was similar to ink. I then washed the models with the ink, allowing it to sit in all the models details, using a brush to manipulate the ink as it dried.

20180915_160612.jpg
How the Banshee looked after the paint dried.

As you can see from the image above, once I let the paint dry the thinness of the paint I applied allowed the figure to retain its translucency whilst it gained a bluish tint, and greater definition of its features. Because the paint was thin it also had the benefit of not completely removing the face that was printed on the figure.

Now I have two good looking Banshee figures, that could also double as Ghosts, Spectres or other spectral undead in a game of D&D.

 

If you want to check out more of my Dungeons and Dragons content just click here!

Betrayal at Baldur’s Gate

After having a very enjoyable time playing Betrayal at House on the Hill with some friends I decided to pick up a copy myself. Whilst I was looking up the game I discovered that there was a Dungeons and Dragons version of this game; Betrayal at Baldur’s Gate.

I had no choice, I had to get it!

When the box arrived I opened it and was pleasantly surprised to discover that the figures inside the box are very well detailed and molded, and at the same scale as general war-game figures with a 1 inch base (or close enough to pass). However the painting on these figures was, in my view, terrible. The half-orc and the drow had well-printed eyes, but apart from that the painting just completely undermined these beautifully sculpted figures.

20180511_202110.jpg
Fresh out the box. Look at that poor Red Wizard of Thay’s face!

This post is unfortunately not a step-by-step on how I fixed these paint-jobs, as I painted these before I decided to record my painting process. This is more of a showcase of what I can do, given that my first two posts were all about inking, without substantial painting to the models.

20180512_160049.jpg
Look at that Paladin’s armour shine!

I have almost finished painting these figures; I just have to complete the ranger (seen in green at the back of the second picture) but I will be more interested in posting up more extensive paint-jobs I do on the Rage of Demons figures I have, followed up by some Warhammer 40,000 and some figures from the Castle Ravenloft and Legend of Drizzt board games.

Rage of Demons: Lizardfolk

Following on from my Banshee post I decided I would post another model that I only had to ink for me to be completely satisfied with the end product. That model is a Lizardfolk that I got out of the same set of Rage of Demons boxes that I got the Banshees out of.

 

How the Lizardfolk model looked out of the box.

Once again the modelling on this particular model is beautiful and precise. This is joined with an excellent paint job; one of the best paint jobs I have seen on these models. The paint is on the correct parts and does not overlap onto sections it should not be, even the printed on face is precise.  This figure looks almost exactly like the artwork in both the Monster Manual and Volo’s Guide to Monsters.

The only thing I was unhappy with was the fact that all of those beautiful details were not emphasised by the painting. With that in mind I watered down some paints again!

I mixed a very dark, almost black, shade of green and watered it down into an almost ink-like texture once again. I then carefully painted it only over the green and brown painted parts of the model, making sure that it stuck in all the needed cracks and crevices. Once I had done this I mixed a dark yellow; not too dark, but enough to add some shade to the cream coloured scales that were on the Lizardfolk’s belly and underside. In the same way I then inked the cream scales and left it all to dry.

 

How the Lizardfolk looked after ‘inking’.

As can be seen the adding of the ultra-thin paint just makes the model ‘pop’; you can even see detail on the shield that I had not even noticed before painting, and the whole model is lifted to a new level.

I will post up some images of more extensive paint-jobs soon.

Rage of Demons: Banshee

I bought a few boxes of the Dungeons and Dragons mini-figures for Rage of Demons. I have recently bought the Out of the Abyss adventure and as I was reading through it I thought I would see how the mini-figures look, and I was very impressed.

The figures are very well molded, and very nicely detailed however unsurprisingly the paint work on them as a lot to be desired. Often the printed-on eyes look much better than I could achieve with paints, but they are often not placed accurately, and the rest of the paint on the models is, generally, of a low quality.

With that in mind I have decided to record my painting of these models. The first models I painted were two Banshees I picked up from two different boxes.

20180915_160408
How the Banshee looked out of the box.

As you can see the molding is very detailed and the plastic it is made out of works perfectly for a ghost-like enemy, along with the printed on face, which is very accurate on this figure.

Personally I prefer my models details to be emphasised, and this being a Banshee I wanted it to be illuminated in a slightly sickly green-blue hue, to emphasise the unnatural nature of the creature.

With that in mind I mixed some green, blue and black acrylic paints and watered the dark turquoise colour down heavily until the consistency was similar to ink. I then washed the models with the ink, allowing it to sit in all the models details, using a brush to manipulate the ink as it dried.

 

20180915_160612.jpg
How the Banshee looked after the paint dried.

 

As you can see from the image above, once I let the paint dry the thinness of the paint I applied allowed the figure to retain its translucency whilst it gained a bluish tint, and greater definition of its features. Because the paint was thin it also had the benefit of not completely removing the face that was printed on the figure.

Now I have two good looking Banshee figures, that could also double as Ghosts, Spectres or other spectral undead in a game of D&D.